9 things to do in Athens on bank holidays

If you find yourself in Athens on May Day (May 1, International Workers Day) or on one of the other public holidays, you might feel disappointed that the Acropolis and museums aren’t open. But don’t be too annoyed about your visit falling on a public holiday as there are plenty of things to do in Athens on bank holidays.

I visited Athens as part of my project to go to all the European Union capitals, but I didn’t do enough research and ended up arriving in Athens just in time for May Day – a bank holiday when almost everything in Athens is closed. I was pretty cross with myself, but visiting Athens on a public holiday turned out just fine.

Bank holidays in Athens in 2020

Dates when the Acropolis and Parthenon are closed are marked in bold. The Acropolis Museum is also closed on most of these days, with the exception of March 25, when the museum is open and free of charge.

  • New Year’s Day – Wednesday, January 1
  • Epiphany – Monday, January 6
  • Orthodox Ash Monday – Monday, March 2
  • Independence Day – Wednesday, March 25
  • Orthodox Good Friday – Friday, April 17
  • Orthodox Easter Sunday – Sunday, April 19
  • Orthodox Easter Monday – Monday, April 20
  • Labour Day – Friday, May 1
  • Orthodox Whit Sunday – Sunday, June 7
  • Orthodox Whit Monday – Monday, June 8
  • Assumption Day – Saturday, August 15
  • Ochi Day – Wednesday, October 28
  • Christmas Day – Friday, December 25
  • 2nd Day of Christmas – Saturday, December 26

The best things to do in Athens on public holidays

1. Visit the Roman Agora

The Roman Agora in Athens, empty of visitors on May 1. This photo was taken through the fence!
The Roman Agora in Athens, empty of visitors on May 1. This photo was taken through the fence!

Fair enough, you can’t go inside Athens’ Roman Agora on public holidays. But the Roman Agora is surrounded by public streets and a low fence, so you can see a lot of the site from outside. The bonus is, that with the site empty, you won’t have any random people in your picture of the Tower of the Winds.

2. Explore Plaka

Stairs in the Plaka district
Stairs in the Plaka district of Athens
Street art in Plaka
Street art in Plaka

The stepped streets and narrow lanes of the Plaka district under the Acropolis are open 24/7, including on bank holidays. Take your time and let yourself get lost, discovering churches and street art before sitting down in a shady restaurant (yes, they’re open!).

3. Agios Eleftherios Church

The tiny Agios Eleftherios church next to the Metropolitan cathedral
The tiny Agios Eleftherios church next to the Metropolitan cathedral

You won’t be able to see the inside of this mini, Byzantine-era church made of bits of ancient temples on bank holidays, but you can walk around the outside and see the contrast between its tiny size and its big brother, the Metropolitan Cathedral of Athens, next door.

4. Arch of Hadrian

Hadrian's Gate is open 24/7 with no entrance charge
Hadrian’s Gate is open 24/7 with no entrance charge

Even when other sites are closed, you can still get up close with Athen’s history. The Arch of Hadrian, or Hadrian’s Gate is right next to one of Athen’s busiest roads in the centre of the city and is free to visit any day of the year.

The magnificent Temple of Olympian Zeus archaeological site next to Hadrian’s Arch is closed on May 1 but you can look through the fence to get a sense of the huge scale of the temple, once the largest in Ancient Greece.

5. May Day protests

A protest in Syntagma Square on May 1 2017
A protest in Syntagma Square on May 1 2017

Not all visitors will be comfortable doing this, but if you’re in Athens for the May Day bank holiday it’s interesting to see the protests and parades which happen on Syntagma Square on May 1. As always, trust your gut, but we found the May Day protests to be peaceful and it gave us a good insight into the political environment in Greece.

6. See the Greek Presidential Guard (Evzones)

The changing of the guard outside the Presidential Palace
The changing of the guard outside the Presidential Palace
A Presidential Guard, or Evzone, at his post
A Presidential Guard, or Evzone, at his post

We didn’t see the changing of the guard in Syntagma Square because of the May 1 protests but after a walk through the National Garden (which is open on public holidays) we found ourselves opposite the Presidential Palace which has Evzones in their traditional uniforms stationed outside. Their ceremonial changing of the guard outside the palace lasted around 15 minutes with only a handful of us watching.

7. Panathenaic Stadium

You can easily see the Pantheatic Stadium from the street
You can easily see the Pantheatic Stadium from the street

This beautiful horseshoe-shaped marble stadium is closed on public holidays, including May Day, but is only separated from the public area by a low fence, so you can see the whole thing without needing to go inside.

8. Go up Lycabettus Hill

The funicular railway to the top of Lycabettis Hill runs through a tunnel
The funicular railway to the top of Lycabettus Hill runs through a tunnel

This Athens tourist attraction is open 365 days a year, including Christmas Day, Easter and all bank holidays. You can either get the funicular railway up to the top or walk, but you’ll already have climbed a good part of the hill to get to the teleferik station for the funicular, and it is expensive at 7.50 Euro each (cash only, no cards). The train runs through a tunnel for its entire length so you don’t even get a good view on the way.

The view from the top of Lycabettus Hill, with the Panathenaic Stadium on the left and the Acropolis on the right
The view from the top of Lycabettus Hill, with the Panathenaic Stadium on the left and the Acropolis on the right
Looking out from one of the bars on Lycabettus Hill
Looking out from one of the bars on Lycabettus Hill

At the top, you’ll find a couple of bars and restaurants, a tiny church, and a stunning view over Athens and the Acropolis, to Piraeus and the Aegean Sea beyond.

9. The Acropolis and Parthenon

The Acropolis from the roof of our hotel
The Acropolis from the roof of our hotel

Not visiting them of course – Athens’ most famous sights lock their gates for most public holidays, but you can get a great view from the many rooftop bars in the city. We were lucky enough to be staying in a hotel with a bar on the roof but there are loads of others, including the Athens Gate hotel bar and the 360 cocktail bar in Monastiraki. Try to be there in the hour before sunset to see the Parthenon change colour from white to warm yellow, before the nighttime illuminations switch on.

(Bonus 10.) Eat and drink

Don’t worry about eating and drinking in Athens on May 1 or other public holidays. Restaurants and bars throughout the main tourist areas including Plaka, Monastiraki and Psirri are open and busy with Athenians enjoying their day off and visitors enjoying the city.

Have you visited Athens on a public holiday?

9 things to do in Athens on public holidays

8 thoughts on “9 things to do in Athens on bank holidays”

  1. Love your tips, totally agree! I am sure also the little cruises operate to the many small islands, so I would add that as a tip how to spend the day! They can be arranged even through hotels for about 90 euros, and you get to spend the day on sea and see beautiful islands such as Hydra, Poros and Aegina!

    Reply
  2. Great Article Helen!! I just realised through my research that i am there in Athens on 1st of May (2019) and so many things are closed. Your article gave me hope that i wont be wasting my time in Athens and still be able to enjoy the city on such a day.

    Thanks!

    Reply

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